If you're not smart enough to win a bet on a game, you're probably not smart enough to fix a game either. GLMS is helping catcher cheaters by monitoring betting data.

  • The Global Lottery Monitoring System (GLMS) focuses on sports betting integrity for lottery providers across the world.
  • Out of the 209 alerts sent to GLMS partners, 190 of them were for soccer matches alone.
  • European Soccer attributed to a total of 166 alerts. Sports betting has long been legal in the U.K.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – On Tuesday, The Global Lottery Monitoring System (GLMS) released its third-quarter report for 2019. GLMS tracks suspicious sports betting activity for its lottery partners throughout the globe.

The report shows 209 alerts sent for unusual betting patterns in Q3, of which 190 of them were for soccer. Of all the alerts sent, only nine of them were classified as code red, meaning that there could be rumors of match-fixing from a named source.

“GLMS Monitoring and intelligence have been particularly intense with the beginning of the new sport season, however, over Q3, we were pleased to continue to build solid foundations for global responsibilities and actions in the fight against sport competition manipulations,” said Ludovico Calvi, President of GLMS.

In the Q3 report for GLMS, European soccer specifically was responsible for 156 alerts. Legal sports betting in the U.K. has been around since 1961 and the combined countries house thousands of sportsbooks.

As legal sports betting in the U.S. continuously expands, concerns over the integrity of sports have risen. Professional sports leagues have lobbied many state governments to include integrity fees for extra protocols the leagues will have to take to make sure each game is safe from corruption.

Earlier this week, the US Department of Justice indicted and arrested an individual for trying to fix an NCAA college basketball match. However, scandals involving match-fixing have existed even before states were given the ability to open their own sportsbooks.

GLMS is actively operating in the U.S. now and the Q3 report shows very little alerts sent on behalf of American sports. For North America in total, there were only seven alerts sent. Soccer accounted for two alerts, American football was responsible for four, and tennis accounted for one.

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