Fantasy sports

  • HB 6451 has passed in the Connecticut house to expand gambling and launch regulated sports betting.
  • The new bill requires daily fantasy sports (DFS) operators to apply for new licenses.
  • This would end DFS for a period in Connecticut.

HARTFORD, Conn. – While the legal sports betting bill is moving forward in Connecticut, it is leading to a potential temporary ending of daily fantasy sports (DFS) in the Constitution State.

The bill will expand on gambling as a whole, bringing mobile sports betting to Connecticut but will also create new requirements for both DFS operators and local businesses with season sports contests.

While this won’t end DFS permanently, the fact that the product would be unavailable for a long stretch has many betting fans and operators in the legal sports betting market concerned.

DFS Troubles

HB 6451 passed in the Connecticut House 122-21 showing that there is a strong push to expand gambling in the state and launch the local regulated market.

The bill requires all fantasy sports operators to be licensed through one of the three licensees. With the bill passing, it would essentially make all current DFS operators null and void and incapable of offering their products in Connecticut.

The licenses would still be debated through legislation to determine how they would work, making it impossible for operators like FanDuel or DraftKings to get a new betting license.

During this period of debate, there essentially will be no DFS market. In addition, local businesses that run season-long sports contests will be barred as well as the bill requires them to also gain these new licenses.

The Mohegan Tribe and the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe will run the new market exclusively, so all Connecticut sports betting related licenses would have to go through them.

“Connecticut is on cusp of providing a modern, technologically advanced gaming experience for our residents, which will be competitive with our neighboring states,” said Ned Lamont, Governor of Connecticut. “Our state’s tribal partners have worked with my administration thoughtfully, deliberately, and in a constructive fashion for the past few months, and we have achieved an agreement that is best for Connecticut residents and their respective tribal members. We will work to see it ratified and look forward to doing so through a collaborative effort, to include working with elected leaders in the General Assembly.”

So far despite pushback, the bill seems to be running on schedule. The stalled DFS market may cause legislators to expedite deliberation should the bill pass in the Senate.

Local DFS players may just have to be patient as lawmakers iron out the final details on the new licenses.

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